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English 39
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
experienced an unusual light show. ktvu's allie rasmus asked nasa about the activity. >> reporter: kids were captivated by the activities, but many parents had questions and concerns about recent cosmic activity. >> it gives you the opportunity to get the big picture and see what is happening out there. >> reporter: first was the asteroid that struck russia creating a sonic boom that injured thousands. later in the day people watched afterroid ad-13 skim by. and mittt minutes after that, a much smaller meteor created a flash seen across the bay area. >> it was a cosmic coincidence. a lot of times they want to know if they are related and i tell them they are not related. >> thee in one day and makes up workmanship if the next one is around corner. >> reporter: three cosmic objects passing by or into earth in one day isn't unusual, but what is rare that they all passed over populated area and were recorded and shared with a worldwide audience. like the video on youtube of yesterday's bay area meteor captured by a driver in san francisco. >> most of the earth is 70% water and most of them
nasa. it was more of a member is of and a from his sons couple close friends. the eulogies were mostly about his humility. that is what i remember most about neil. one of the most humble guys i ever met, most self-effacing, never bragged. never thought about looked at me, i am first on the moon. and it probably the most talented guy i knew as far as pilot skills go. >> you were if prior -- you were a fighter pilot. >> right, and so was he, in korea. then he got out of the navy. so he was an accomplished pilot when he came to nasa. i think if anybody should have been first on the moon, it was neil armstrong because he had the skill and the humility to carry that load. >> we talked last night at dinner. when you were flying at the lunar module down, commander is on one side and the other guy is on the other side. it makes it easier for one person to get out first. talked-about -- talk about that. >> who's gonna be first out? the lunar module pilot is on the right side as the face forward. the commander is on the left side. and you are standing. it takes a couple hours to get to take up -
. with nasa cutting back, how do with nasa cutting back, how do prevent another tragedy like at a dry cleaner, with nasa cutting back, how do prevent another tragedy like we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. did you know not all fiber is the same? citrucel is different- it's the only fiber for regularity that won't cause excess gas. it's gentle and clinically proven to help restore and maintain regularity. look for citrucel today. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you could business pro. yes, you could. go national. go like a pro. neil: tax hikes cking in. whole foods trying to pump up business by bringing prices down. they say that they are trying to
mile across and more than 600 feet deep. nasa estimates that an object this size approaches earth every 40 years with the likelihood of a strike every 12,000 years. scientists worldwide claim that the mir astronauts were unrelated because of their very different trajectories. the $4 trillion global telecommunications industry is breathing a sigh of relief tonight as that astra crossed over the gm synchronous orbit of more than 1,000 telecommunications and weather satellites without incident. fox news correspondent bill keating has our report. ♪ this * is going away. >> reporter: asteroid be a 14 is more than 55,000 miles from earth moving away from us not to return for decades. this * came very close to earth in fact another close as astra flyby in recorded history. 17,000 miles. in the world is down -- astronomers response on predicting we would all be fine from the century, now worth impact. at least not this time. there are an estimated one millions base rocks near earth orbit. >> we have seen and tracked about 9,000 of them right now. and about 1,000 of them are potentially hazard
shattered of about 20 football .ields nasa says it is the biggest in more hit the earth 100 years. is believed to have created this huge hole in a frozen lake. police keep curious onlookers off the ice while divers search for fragments. hunters from around the world onld like to get their hands of that rock. it could be pretty valuable. there is no doubt that oflions of dollars in value pieces fell to the earth. hours after the meteor hit scientists say a 150 foot asteroid missed the earth .- missed the earth and a fireball lit up the sky over san francisco. it turned out to be a media or nothing toar, but do with the one in russia. utah family got the shock of their lives when they went on a ride in a small plane. the plane crash and the whole thing caught on camera. is everybody ok? the voice you heard was john jonathan f ding -- ielding. the couple had their seven- jacob on board. ok.yone made it lost power because the engine was frozen. catherine says despite the accident she will fly again. now to the aftermath of that at sea.e the disabled carnival cruise lines. more passeng
, nasa has been charged by congress with keeping a 24-hour-a-day seven-day-a-week watch on the skies, and they're doing this principally with three observatories in new mexico, california and puerto rico, that have discovered about 98% of all the asteroid we know that are out there. >> axelrod: if they identify a potential threat what can then be done by way of a defense system? well, that's a real possibility. you don't want to destroy these things. they're too dangerous and it's too impractical. what you can do is deflect them. nasa has already perfected the art of landing on asteroids orbiting asteroids and we even fired an impactor into the side of a comet to study the debris. you can do the same impact mod welan asteroid and speed it up or slow it down by as little as a few centimeters a second. that way had it arrives at earth's orbit we've already passed by or haven't arrived at the rendezvous yet. >> axelrod: just a fraction. >> just a fraction. >> axelrod: in south africa today the extended family of olympic runner oscar pistorius came to his defense claiming the state's own
there are a million such objects out there. nasa is doing a very good job cataloging all the ones they can, but so far they've been able to find just about 10,000 of them. so we're a little ways away from having the complete inventory. >> schieffer: well, let me just ask you this question-- is there something the government ought to be doing or science ought to be doing that it's not doing? >> actually, believe it or not we are handling this one well. in 1995, nasa authorized-- or rather, congress authorized nasa to scan the skies 24 hours a at day, seven days a week, to look for these objects and we're doing it at three observatories in california, new mexico, and puerto rico. and those three observatories have accounted for about 98% of the bodies we know are out there. now, there are ways to defend ourselves once we know it's out there. and we have the technology to do it. it's just a question of putting the money together and deciding to do that. >> schieffer: all right well, that is a little bit reassuring, and thank you very much for helping us on something that most of us know absolutely nothin
to discover more asteroids than earth-based telescopes have over the past 30 years. nasa has reportedly found most of the big asteroids that could wipe out mankind, but the smaller ones that could take out cities or regions, we only know about 1% of those. the goal for sentinel is to find those, and if we have several years warning scientists believe we could deflected any earth-bound rocks away from us. the bottom line, they don't want us to be blind-sided like we were yesterday when a large ten-ton meteor barrelled across the sky in siberia, traveling 59 more than 30,000 miles per hour, creating a shockwave that blew out windows and knocked down part of a factory. more than 1,000 people were injured. also yesterday, a 150-foot asteroid gave earth a close shave, passing 17,000 miles above the planet's surface. what's unnerve being that one, astronomers discovered it last year, too late do us any good if it was going to hit us. the asteroid gods treated the bay area to an amazing light show last night this is video of a fireball streaking across our sky around 8:00 in the evening. today the a
of collisions. >> reporter: aware, but how well is the world prepared? nasa budgeted $20 million last year to look for objects that may hit the earth but some scientists say more money should be spent on detection and ways to avoid a possible collision. >> we've gotten very good at finding the big things, the kilometer sized objects. we're working down to smaller objects. but there's many more of the small objects like these than there are of the big ones. >> i'd say the appropriate technology for deflecting a dangerous asteroid could possibly be a nuclear bomb, but the key is catching and detecting the objects early. >> reporter: experts say that friday's blast could have killed thousands of people had the meteor landed in the middle of a large city, a reminder they say that even smaller objects threatening earth should be a wake-up call. >> we knew factually we lived in a celestial falling rock zone, but friday taught us, reminded us that we live in a shooting gallery, in fact, we got into a crossfire. >> reporter: the power of the universe on display here on earth. michelle franzen, nbc
this area is so cold. nasa estimates the meteor exploded with the force of at least 20 hiroshima atomic bombs. >> if this amount of energy had been detonated at ground level, instead of ten miles up, it would have probably leveled a -- every single building in an area the size of chicago. >> reporter: local officials say the explosion injured more than 1,000 people and caused about $33 million in damage. cameras captured the meteor in the sky over russia. now crews are trying to find fragments in a lake about 50 miles from the town. scientists say an event of this magnitude happens about once every hundred years but they say it's not uncommon for meteors to impact the planet more often. >> we are hit by about 100 tons of space debris every day. >> reporter: the explosion in russia and an asteroid that just missed earth has people looking up. late friday, some in the san francisco bay area reported seeing a fireball streaking through the sky. experts say it was likely another meteor. but the three events are unrelated. tatiana anderson for cbs news. >>> for thousands of passengers aboard
promised to replace all windows within a week. nasa estimates the explosion was about 30 times the size of the nuclear bomb dropped on hiroshima. local officials say it injured more than 1,000 people and caused about $33 million in damage. cameras captured the meteor in the sky over central russia. now, crews are trying to find fragments of it in a lake about 50 miles from the town of chelyabinsk. there's a large hole where some say part of the meteor fell. scientists say an event of this magnitude happens once about every hundred years but it's not uncommon they say for meteors to impact the planet more often. >> earth is hit with 100 tons of space debris every day. and that includes at least one basketball sized object. >> reporter: the explosion in russia and the asteroid that just missed earth has people looking up. tatiana anderson for cbs news. >>> it feels like you're on a roller coaster pretty much. >> a roller coaster into the history books. how the crew of this racing yacht was able to do it. -- h >> and looking out from our kpix 5 newsroom
a week. nasa estimates the explosion was about 30 times the size of the nuclear bomb dropped on hiroshima. local officials say it injured more than 1,000 people and caused about $33 million in damage. cameras captured the meteor in the sky over central russia. now, crews are trying to find fragments of it in a lake about 50 miles from the town. there's a large hole where some say part of the meteor fell. scientists say an event of this magnitude happens once about every hundred years but it's not uncommon they say for meteors to impact the planet more often. >> earth is hit with 100 tons of space debris every day. and that includes at least one basketball sized object. >> reporter: the explosion in russia and the asteroid that just missed earth has people looking up. tatiana anderson for cbs news. it has been four days since the hunt for fugitive ex-cop chris dorner ended in a burning cabin in big bear. >>> and with the man hunt now over, people are heading back to the resort area. cbs reporter louisa hodge is in big bear with reaction from
that are projected to a flat plan, we take pictures around an object so you get 3d digital model. nasa's case, we scanned the image of insulated tile and then we create repair, that's idea call shape of the damage. this data gets sent up to space station and they cut it out with the repair and the spacewalker can go out, fit it in, seal it, and then the damage is repaired. >> and we've got some props on the desk. tell me about what you brought us today. >> okay. so this is a 3d printed shoe and we're experimenting the art, which is a mesh of many object. the material, lighter weight with a lot of empty spaces. in the heel, and then also it is molded to the shape of my feet so it's completely custom made. >> ping, good to have you on the program. thank you so much. >>> up next, the coming news in the upcoming week that will be have impact "on the money." and is the city of new york city takeout in jeopardy? may michael bloomberg's list of banned substances as we take a break. look at how the stock market ended the week. back in a moment. look at how th market ended the week. back in a moment. look
here on earth. nasa has reportedly found most of the ones that could destroy our planet but as far as the ones that are smaller and destroy cities and wipe out regions, as far as those are concerned 99% are a mystery to us, we only now about 1% of them. the foundation believes it's so-called sentinel telescope can discover more asteroids in its first month of service in 2018 than all of our earth-based telescopes have been able to do over the past 30 years. scientists believe they could be deflected away from earth if we have several years warning. we need years, not months. you think about the 150-foot asteroid that passed close to earth yesterday. that was only discovered last year, no one enough time to done any good. that's what the b-612 foundation is trying to change. on a side note about the fireball seen streaking over the west coast including the bay area last night around 8:00, today the american meteor society says that that meteor was not what we would consider to be a major event. that these things happen every night around the world just not always over densely popula
-out windows. nasa says this was the biggest meteor to hit earth in over a century, weighing more than the eiffel tower, its explosion in the atmosphere, the equivalent of 30 hiroshima bombs. officials say over 1,200 people were injured, over 4,000 buildings damaged and over 1 million square feet of glass shattered, the size of about 20 football fields. there are broken storefronts and windows like this one all throughout the city, you can see them all the way down the street behind me. the city is littered with broken glass that caused most of the injuries. the hunt is on for thousands of fragments that could have hit the ground. divers searched this frozen lake where one piece is thought to have created this massive hole in the ice. they aren't the only ones looking. meteor hunters from around the world are calling this is a once in a lifetime opportunity. >> i haven't been able to sleep for the past two days. >> reporter: one of them told us that a small piece could be worth thousands of dollars. thousands of dollars. bigger chunks, hundreds of thousands. >> there's no doubt that mi
from nasa or the military. and that's what we're seeing working. of course, a lot of spaghetti taxpayer dollars thrown against the wall. the market don't want electric cars or electric battery cars. it leaves them feeling like they'll be stranded in the woods without any gas or any power to get out of the woods. it stresses them out. so we talk a lot also about nat gas, yes, it's helped by the federal government, but that was a resource that was sitting there. electric batteries had to be developed by people with a lot of taxpayer money. >> morgan, even folks like from the "washington post," charles lane, was talking about how americans just don't want electric cars. for all the money we pour, for all the tax breaks we give to people who buy them, americans still don't want them because they deliver inferior performance at a much higher cost, like much of what the government does. >> yeah. so going back to my point, we streamline where we're make these investments and there is a wealth of data that shows that some of these investments have been very wasteful. going back to natural gas,
damaged, and more than a million square feet of glass shattered the size of 20 football fields. nasa says it's the biggs meteor to hit the earth in more than 100 years. one piece is believed to created a huge hole in this frozen lake. drivers are searching for fragments. meteor hunters would like to get their hands on a piece of the rofnlgt it could be pretty valuable, depending hundred big it is. >> there's no doubt that millions and million of dollars in value, pieces, fell to the earth. >> hours after the meteor hit russia, scientists said the asteroid missed the earth by only 17,000 miles, coming closer than satellites and late friday night, fire ball lit up the sky over san francisco. it turn out to be a meteor or shooting star, nothing to do with the one in russia. >> ama: new at 11:00, an east bay man suffered only minor cuts after losing control of his brand new motorcycle and slamming into a house. the incident happened in antioch this evening. police said the man was on his driveway, doing some sort of maneuver with the bike, when he lost control. the 2013 harley davidson smashe
there. go look it the web site on nasa. you can see every landing site. if anybody does not believe we ever went to the moon, does go look at that. [laughter] >> charlie, it's funny. i met you in texas. i did not know this but you were the guy who had some very famous words as apollo 11 was going through its trials and tribulations. talk about that. you are part of history for that. >> i was very fortunate to have been involved in five of the nine missions we sent to the moon. i started with apollo 10. it was not designed to land. i helped develop the procedures to activate the lunar module. i was in mission control when i started talking to them when they started the descent. that was a dress rehearsal for apollo 11. the first time we going to attempt the landing on the moon. neil armstrong asked me to do the same job for them on apollo 11. two months, we had to get ready. we modified the procedure somewhat. then we were ready to go. so i was in mission control of the dissent. as we started down, things started coming unglued we have computer problems. we had a trajectory problem take
cold. nasa estimates the meteor exploded with the force of at least 20 hiroshima atomic bombs. >> it could have probably leveled every single building in an area the size of chicago. >> reporter: local officials say the explosion injured more than 1,000 people and caused about 33 million in damage. cameras captured the meteor in the sky over russia. now crews are trying to find fragments in a leg about 50 miles from chelyabinsk. scientists say an event of this magnitude happens about once every 100 years, but they say it's not uncommon for meteors to impact the planet more often. >> we are hit by about 100 tons of space debris every day. >> reporter: the explosion in russia and an asteroid that just missed earth has people looking up. late friday, some in the san francisco bay area reported seeing a fireball streaking through the sky. experts say it was likely another meteor, but that the three events are unrelated. tatiana anderson for cbs news. >>> it's a mistake they won't make again. the crafty way a couple tracked down their stolen
within a week. nasa estimates the explosion was about 30 times the size of the nuclear bomb dropped on hiroshima. it caused $33 million in damage. cameras captured the meteor in the sky over central russia. now, crews are trying to find fragments of it in a lake about 50 miles from chelyabinsk. there's a large hole where some say part of the meteor fell. scientists say an event of this magnitude happens about once every 100 years but it's not uncommon for meteors to impact the earth often. >> earth is hit with 100 tons of space debris every day and that includes at least one basketball sized object. >> reporter: the explosion and astroid that just missed earth has people looking up. >> while russia copes with the aftermath of that meteor, residents of northern california panicked when they saw a fireball streak across the sky. in fact, dozens called the american meteor society to find out what was happen. turns out it was likely a fairly common meteor, according to that group, and the fireball did not cause any injuries. >>> a desperate search for survivors tonight after a bomb blas
bombs. nasa estiiates & the mmteer tt have been about 55-feet cross and weighiig 10-tons ... tteesame as smalllr than the unrelattd asttroid that fleewby earth a flew hours later. the damaged buildings and brokeen windows ... creating a dangerous situation... ith midday temperatures overing around 11 degrees fahrenhhit. oo ... ssme residents are peading out to a frozennlake toolooo for meeeorite fragments.morozov sayy: "ii noticed thattone of these down this way. aad i thouggt, an asteroid issflyyng, there are shatters, i better pay and thennof ourse go aad explore them.'' on cam ttg) the region's gvernorr estimates theedamage to be - around thirty-three million & dollars.he s ppommsiig residenns ll bboken windows willlbe reppaced in a week.in lossangelle, dam ousley, ffx nnww. -3 3p this tax season is -3 on-hhld foo some filers... as the i-r-s makes changes to complyywitt the fiscal cciff 3 until this week... the i-r-s was not acccpting somme specialized tax forms... like depreciatton of property forms & as
well is the world prepared? nasa budgeted $20 million last year to look for objects that may hit the earth, but scientists say that more money should be spent on detection and ways to avoid possible collision. >> we have gone very good at finding the big things, of kilometre-size objects. there are many more small objects, like these, then there are the big ones. >> i would say the corporate technology to reflect an asteroid could be a nuclear bomb. the key is catching and detecting the obvious early. >> experts say friday's blast could have killed thousands of people had the mir landed in the middle of a large city, all -- a reminder that smaller objects coming into earth's atmosphere should be a wake-up call. >> we know we live in a celestial falling rocks zone. friday reminded us that we live in a shooting gallery. in fact, we got into a cross fire. >> the power of the universe on display here on earth. wbal tv 11 news. >> the sky is falling. it is wild. the maryland turks upset -- terps upset duke, the incredible win had fans charging onto the court. >>, chicken sav buying on
is not gay. >> according to nasa, a 130,000 ton asteroid is expected to narrowly hit missing earth this friday. the science dude and wondered if global warming had anything to do with it. >> our science guy, talk about something else falling from the sky, and that is an asteroid. what is coming our way? is this because of global warming or some occasion? >> it is the word meteorology and the word meteor come from the same root. >> oh like you know. >> how do we know global warming isn't at fault? >> come on, deborah. she is a space cadet. maybe she was searching for words. >> you know i think we should blame bush or cheney or alec baldwin. >> i like all of them, actually. >> we bought this so much now. now it just comes right off the lips. we blame everything so this makes sense. >> it is like how you know somebody is uninterruptiing. they start talking -- uninteresting. they start talking about the weather and now everybody adds their two cents. must be global warming or so much for global warning. >> it is like i am going to add this boring thing, this observation that makes it m
the second. >> the project pre sently received 5 million in funding from nasa. one in russia insisted it was not a meteor, but john considerry a new weapons of mass destruction from texas in the united states. one of president obama's favorite spots to grab a bit. ray's hell burger, reportedly owes overdue rent and court fees and a second location closed for business and president obama has visited the spot with vice-president biden and russian president med investiga med did he ha med-- >> and how does he stay so-- >> those restaurants are popular in northern virginia, it's hard to believe. >> clayton: have you even at ray's hell burger. >> tucker: i don't, but the traffic. always packed. >> clayton: and how do you have $39,000 in back rent to pay? if they're lining out the door. let's talk about a new census bureau study revealing what it means to be middle class. certainly obviously during the campaign we hear the term middle class, both sides playing to try to the middle class. the president during his state of the union used middle class eight times, but what does it mean? here i
information about the meteor that exploded on friday. nasa says the meteor was bigger than originally thought. they say the fire ball was 55 feet wide and weighed about 10,000 tons. it was traveling at 40,000 miles per hour when it exploded over siberia. >>> and another milestone for michael jordan. the basketball legend turns 50 today. happy birthday, m.j. >>> that was the pope this morning speaking from his window at the vatican while thousands of people gathered at st. peteers square. this is the pope's second to last sunday before retirement. the pope announced last week he is stepping down by the end of the month. anne thompson with more ont that. >> reporter: more than 50,000 people came to hear the pope. that is double the size of last week's crowd. he spoke to them in six different languages thanking them for their prayers and support and added in his native german that these were difficult days and the crowd in turn responded with respect and affection. in rome where there is no shortage of must-see attractions suddenly elderly pope benedict is number one on everyone's list. today he
five million in funding from nasa. in the end of the day. it is the president's decision and i can't believe one democratic colleague is not upset enough to speak out. >> stiantor graham called hagel a radical choice and in an exclusive interview with chris wallace, graham made the case for putting the brakes on. >> nomination of former senator chuck hagel is on hold. do you think he will succeed when we get back from tha brake? >> it is it interesting, we talked about with several people on the i thought so in the beginning of the show and not so sure by the end of the show. lindsay graham is leading the charge and holding upment nomination and he got something moments before going on the air. there a blog report that hagel had said that the state department, that the u.s. state department was adjunct of the israeli foreign ministry and that he thinks israel has an undue influence on the foreign policy. hagel said i never said and i do i want believe it we'll see. to graham is that enough. he said let's make sure it is true. if it turned out it is not true and he could be in serio
anywhere. >> reporter: the yearly catch is shipped to nasa's johnson space center. here in the non-december crypt building number 31... >> this is the air shower. reporter: ... where you have to suit up to protect the meteorites from contamination. the precious cargo is unpacked and catalogued under the watchful eye of curator kevin rider. >> they're frozen from the time they're collected and returned all the way along the legs of the journey to get to houston. >> reporter: each sample is carefully examined and given a name based on where it was found. so we get to see a martian meteorite. >> this sample is elephant morain 79001. it's a basaltic rock from mars. >> reporter: it was studying a martian meteorite found in antarctica that led scientists to the discovery that there was once water on mars. and those these ugly ducklings may all look similar to the naked eye each meteorite has different chemical and mineral content. under a polarizing microscope, there is beautiful... they're as beautiful as stained glass windows for it's what they may some day tell us that really matters.
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)

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